Coral

  1. Can feeding alone make corals more adaptable?

    Researchers found that feeding gives the corals a backup way to build caloric energy. The nutrition provided during feeding goes directly to the coral colony and isn’t simply passed on by zooxanthellae. This energy can be directly put to use in building the skeleton and maintaining healthy tissue. It may also be able to aid the coral in mitigating the effects of higher nutrients and perhaps the coral can maintain vitality, even when zooxanthellae are growing faster than usual. For corals,...
  2. Favias, Favias, Favias... Underrated Beauties

    This Article is Sponsored by Legendary Corals. Hello reefers, Darwin here with another article. Mostly a story/ discussion as to what comes out of my reefing head. I haven't done a write up in a while and I was inspired to start this one up after seeing a couple of posts on Facebook coral groups. Excuse any grammer errors or thoughts going everywhere as I wrote this while waiting for my car at the dealership. This might strike you guys as odd as to why I'm not talking about zoas, but this...
  3. SPS Spotlight: Stylophora – Nice And Tough

    When I first started keeping SPS (small polyped stony) corals, I had done my research. Well, I thought I had, but as it turns out there is always more to learn and SPS corals are not all that forgiving when it comes to learning. It is for this very reason that most reputable retailers will advise that SPS corals are not for the beginning reef keeper. That’s good advice – corals can be expensive and SPS corals in particular can command some high prices. I don’t know too many reef hobbyists...
  4. SPS Spotlight: “Pearlberry” – Beautiful, Mysterious, And Finicky

    The Pearlberry is one of those corals that most people look at and think “It’s soooo beautiful – I’m going to try my hand at keeping SPS!” For sure, this is an inspiring coral – it is one of the most spectacular corals in our system, and we sure do love to stare at it. But as most SPS keepers know, the decision to move to the dark side and start keeping the “colored sticks” is not one to be taken lightly. SPS corals can be very demanding and frustrating; even with high-quality water...
  5. ZOA SPOTLIGHT: How The Speckled Krakatoa Got Its Name

    I don’t know about you, but I’ve always been curious about how some zoas get their names. There’s almost an art to picking one with a good ring to it. Trying to have the name, the pattern, the colors of the zoa collide and become something special. Utter Chaos, Flaming Mohican, Krakatoa. I can’t say for sure on the previous mentioned polyps (actually I can on the Krakatoa, but that’s another story), but I was involved in the naming of one particular polyp, and it goes a little somethin’...
  6. Acropora Secale: The Buff Beauty

    Acropora secale is buff. It works out. Not like a “10 minutes on the treadmill” kind of work out, either. This coral is one of the most dense that I have ever kept in my system. It is a high-energy, high-output kind of coral. It obviously loves to consume high amounts of calcium and other ions essential for building its really heavy and thick skeleton. Likewise, it loves high-intensity light and wave action. Like Acropora humilis, A. secale is one of the heavyweights of the reef builders....
  7. Shrooms, The Latest Hot Trend???

    This Article is Sponsored by Legendary Corals. Hello fellow reefers, Darwin here with another blog like story time post! I've been talking about this subject with a couple of friends and it's very noticeable that the demand for these squishies has skyrocketed in the past couple of years. Some people even make it a mission to collect every new piece that comes out now (or even some people who make a vow to collect all the nicest jawbreakers out there *cough cough*). But it wasn't always like...
  8. Explanation on How Zoas Get Their Names

    This Article is Sponsored by Legendary Corals. Hello fellow reefers! I was trolling the zoanthids section of this forum (as usual) and ran across a very interesting topic, asking what does a zoa name really mean (it was interesting because the reefer is a researcher interested in genetics and wanted to see if all zoas were lineaged back to one name)? To save him the trouble I wrote a brief explanation... That got a bit longer with a 1st edit.. and then longer with a 2nd... and then a 3rd......
  9. Unravelling the challenges of Scolymia

    Believe it or not, one of my favorite corals is Scolymia. Yup, that’s right, the “Scoly!” I used to look at them as high-priced “doorstops”, with little to hold my interest: I mean, they don’t “branch”, they don’t wave around in the current, and they don’t encrust like other corals. And, they are surrounded by some of the same garbage-hype and pricing absurdity that I detest about Chalices and Acans...Yuck. You know how I feel about that stuff. However, over time, I found a lot of things...
  10. HOW2TEST: Coral Compatibility

    We have all had a coral or two try to kill its neighbor. The main cause for this is territorial, but some corals just kill nearby corals because they can. Some simply reach out and sting while others can pump out toxins that can do more than enough to clear their bubble. Some can even nuke a whole tank if the coral is large enough, or the tank is small enough for that matter. Even some corals of the same genus may feel threatened by their neighboring relative. Last but not least, some corals...
  11. Symphyllia Symphony!

    There are tons of variations of most types of coral. The Symphyllia coral is no exception. It has a great reputation for being an easy coral so almost anyone can be successful with one. Low to moderate flow is best for these beauties. They are found at varied depths, so the best way to determine lighting is to start the coral at the sand bed and slowly move it around until it looks good to you. They are naturally nocturnal, but like most corals can be trained to come out in the day to feed....
  12. GRAFTING CORALS: The Art Of Coral Grafting

    The art of coral grafting is very risky. It involves fragging corals, which if you have any knowledge on that know it can come with some dangers. They can contain toxins that could potentially kill someone. With proper safety you can cut any fraggable coral with confidence. Once you become a skilled frag master you can start to experiment with the pieces. Let me clear up the notion that grafting corals is the same as grafting trees. A coral will not be genetically altered, it wont grow weird...
  13. The Captain America Palythoa (paly)

    These corals are not here to lead the country, they are here to serve it. Captain America Palythoas are a comic book nerd’s dream coral, well one of them. The coral resembles Captain America’s famous red, white, and blue shield. Due to varying circumstances in individual aquarium, the color scheme may be morphed to a green hue or the red may turn pink. The one thing that stays as true as the superhero is the pattern of the colors themselves. image via reef2reef member @Nanofins You do...
  14. What about the Merulina Coral?

    Are you into rare corals but also like preserving life in the ocean? The Merulina coral, also known as Lettuce, Cabbage, Ridge, or Ruffled Coral, may just be your ticket to preservation! Some species of Merulina coral fall within the Marine Protected Areas. Growing these corals in captivity to study is the only way we can help them stay on our planet and not get lost in the reef. If you have a knack for SPS and want to do your part for science you will love this coral. image via reef2reef...
  15. How to love your Lobo: Tips for success with Lobophyllia

    Have you ever kept a Lobophyllia? These are great "LPS" corals with terrific color patterns and shapes that look great in reefs! If you're like a lot of reefers, you may have kept one before, and either had moderate success, or perhaps had a bad experience. Was thinking about this the other day, because we work with a lot of Lobos, and seem to enjoy much success with them, as do most of our customers who purchase them. it made me think about what the keys to success are with Lobos. I decided...
  16. Random musings on coral frags...The beginning of an open dialogue!

    This Article is Sponsored by @uniquecorals As you might have noticed, we offer and sell a lot of coral frags here at Unique Corals. When you work a lot with frags, even the most dense reefer (hey, that might be me!) can pick up some priceless gems of information that can add to the body of knowledge on the subject. I don't need to remind you of the many benefits of coral frags, but since this is my forum, I will anyways!:mod: Bottom line is this- among the many reasons why frags are so...
  17. Goniopora Or Goner-oh-poo? The Flower Pot Coral

    This is one amazingly hard to keep coral. If you are one of the few who have made it longer than a year than you are truly a supreme reefer. These are known as one of the hardest corals to keep alive…period. Generally these corals die within the first 6-12 months of captivity, but are still available across the nation to even the most beginner of hobbyist.
  18. NPS Not NPR! The Beauty Of Non-Photosynthetic Corals

    Believe it or not, there is a group of corals that does not use Photosynthesis as its main means of energy production, but these corals care requirements should not be left in the dark. Some of these corals can require more food than your cat! Some hobbyists have designed systems with oversized filtration and automated feeders that constantly blast their corals with food. Automated water changes of large quantities are also a common design, for these corals demand pristine water and the...
  19. Got Zoas: GENERAL ZOANTHID CARE

    Zoanthids are one of the most diverse species of coral we see. They come in an infinite array of colors and color morphs. They are mostly compatible with each other, allowing multiple colors in one colony, sometimes even creating new colors. The zoanthid family is very broad and is found in every reef in the sea, so growth rates, lighting, and flow will be a game of trial and error. Luckily, most of the assorted Zoas we find are grown and propagated under similar lighting than what we use so...
  20. Oulophyllia Coral - Moon, Moonstone Coral

    Oulophyllia, although available in the hobby trade, is quite often mislabeled due to its resemblance to other types of Brain corals and may therefore not be offered for sale under its proper name. Due to its overall difference in shape though identification should not be all that difficult, but because it is not a widely available one many wholesalers and stores may not research its correct ID and just sell it as a Brain Coral without giving a scientific name to the coral. It is a large...
  21. Acanthophyllia Coral for the Nano Reef

    Acanthophyllia deshayesiana © Albert J. Thiel This is perhaps not the most commonly available coral, and it is often confused with Scolymia vitiensis, as they look quite similar, and sometimes even with Cynarina lacrimalis, but it certainly is a very nice addition for your Nano-Reef if you can find a nice specimen such as, for instance, the one below: Acanthophyllia deshayesiana © aquaportail Note that although confusion with other similar looking corals is possible and exists, even...
  22. Care of Large Polyp Non-Photosynthetic Corals

    This is a brief description in "Laymans Terms" of how to feed and keep large polyp non-photosynthetic corals (NPS coral). I see countless threads and questions regarding "how to feed my new sun coral", or "how do I get the polyps on my new sun coral to open?" They're honestly a relatively easy coral to keep, some just require a little TLC. The following process can be followed for any large polyp non-photosynthetic coral Genus, such as Tubastrea ("Sun Coral"), Dendrophyllia ("Dendros"),...
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