Selecting a LED Fixture - By Steven Pro

Discussion in 'LED Lighting Specific' started by revhtree, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. dacianb

    dacianb Well-Known Member

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    :) it is weekend already, next week I may go deeper into each aspect, but just to pinpoint few things...
    - CRI - it is not dependant by color temperature, and is not necessary to have high amount of reds in it. Can have high CRI LEDs at 6500K and low CRI LED at 3000k. So, high CRI or low CRI doesn't change anything to PAR/PUR or whatever you consider. Speaking of blackbody temperatures, either 3000 or 10000 k pure blackbody have CRI around 98-99. CRI means having or not certain wavelengths in a source, but not the ratio between them.
    As a replacement of CRI, more and more companies are using Color Quality Scale (CQS) - which is the possible CRI replacement in next years.

    - The patented Osram Oslon NP Blue.... it is Signal PC Blue? (LCB CRBP) - no led chips were ever developed for reefing. Deep blue were produced years before people see them on market and thinks to use them in tanks. Those are the basic brick of any white led. They were released to public ONLY when remote phosphor technology became spread - never for reefs. This PC blue is a deep blue with a thin layer of phosphor on adding some extra wavelengths to original 450 nm. Applications, according to datasheet Signaling, Architectural Lighting indoor, Signal and Symbol Luminary. :). More than a year ago I proposed to use them in a reef light and people on a forum jumped on my head that I am crazy. To continue the story of famous LEDs for reefing - Lime leds-were designed for street lights, violets for medical and forensic, etc

    - most modern, good quality leds have a very stable color whatever dimming method is used. Consider same LED as above, there is only 0.002 CX/CY shifts due to current shift, so that argument is rather invalid. Agree, it is like this on very low quality leds.
    - Lifetime of LEDs - 50k is a no no. For Cree LEDs you may expect 35k (depend by current / chip temperature), where for Luxeons and Osrams can go easily above 100k hours. Lifetime of LEDs have to be specified as T90, T70 or whatever, but LEDs will still burn. They just fade in time. This lifetime number without degrading rate is useless. When you say 50k means 90%, 75% or completely dead??
    - I dont get the idea of Cree XBDs unlicensed can be drive at 350 mA and licensed versions at 700 mA, where on datasheet is written 1000mA. You continue this list with Cree XPE and others.... Me, a regular guy can buy ANY LED bin from Cree, Osram, Luxeon or whatever. And again NEVER a chip was designed or patented for aquarium. We are lucky enough that large consumer markets needs specific colors and they push led manufacturers to produce it, otherwise... :confused:.

    It is Friday late evening, time to enjoy my tank :rolleyes: and nice weekend.
     
  2. Tyler001

    Tyler001 Member

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    When I posted a pic before of the reef breeders led on page two. These corals were in a 36" wide 65 gal now they are in 120 48" Same lighting and this is about 8 months later u can see the growth

    image.jpg
     
  3. Tyler001

    Tyler001 Member

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    Most of the corals tripled in size
     
  4. scardall

    scardall Well-Known Member

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    Interesting data. Thanks. To bad most spec's available from manufactures do not include this type of data on their lighting. It would be nice to use as to compare one to the other. As to the Cree XBD's types(just different grades) the same as Microprocessors ,grade A or B etc. IMO What is really important is the relationship of lighting used from said fixture as it relates to the corals health,growth and color. Most people buy what their buddies tell them is the best etc. To a degree I may be influenced by my friends and in mostly the data for me is important as well too. If your water parameters are correct for what you have and the lighting compliments this,all is good. I use science as my base, then truly knowledgeable hobbyist and the my budget. Remember this no 2 tanks are the same.

    Being the weekend is upon us I'll move over to the beach night life. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::D:D:cool::cool::cool::cool:
     
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  5. Angela2016

    Angela2016 Well-Known Member

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    I would like to know that answer as well. Maybe someone here that has had experience with both could tell us.
     
  6. NanaReefer

    NanaReefer Well-Known Member R2R Supporter

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    This post is 2yrs old. At the time I went with the Reef Radiance Lumentek Pro 180. It was a great unit and grew all my corals well.
    I've since upgraded from this light to a Radion Gen1. I'm loving it!
     
  7. Air_Cooled_Nut

    Air_Cooled_Nut Member

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    No affiliation, just great information:
     
  8. Benedetto84

    Benedetto84 Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering if you could me so insight, so I'm putting together a new 29 gallon tank. 30w x 19H x 12 D. I'm really not wanting to spend over 250 so I was hoping you could give me some ideas on led lighting some decent ones for around that price? I was looking at this one because I keep seeing good reviews and some people are recommending it. I would either make a bracket for it for the canopy or use it with out just on the tank.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/121628257141 image.png
     

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