Using ground probes in aquariums

Discussion in 'Reef Aquarium Discussion' started by Brew12, Oct 20, 2016.

  1. Brew12

    Brew12 Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Article Contributor Partner Member

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    Excellent information! It shows that a properly functioning 20 Amp breaker will trip under 25 amps even if it is at -10C.

    The older UL tests were done at 25C but otherwise it hasn't changed much.
     
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  2. Scubado63

    Scubado63 Well-Known Member

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    Brew12, How did you connect your GFCI outlets to the Apex outlets, I assume it is the 4 empty outlet on the apex, but how did you wire them
     
  3. Brew12

    Brew12 Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Article Contributor Partner Member

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    It is the 4 outlets with the plugs. The picture was taken early in my build. I cut the cords off of a few power strips, prepped the cut ends and wired them into the GFCI's. After that, I just plugged the cord into the outlet on the Apex. Very simple.
     
  4. Paul B

    Paul B Well-Known Member R2R Supporter Article Contributor

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    So I guess this would be bad! :rolleyes:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Brew12

    Brew12 Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Article Contributor Partner Member

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    That is bad, your fish aren't wearing safety goggles!
     
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  6. jasonrusso

    jasonrusso Well-Known Member

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  7. jasonrusso

    jasonrusso Well-Known Member

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    This is the one I bought. It's titanium.


    Deep Blue Professional ADB12000 Ground Control Ti Probe for Aquarium https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005DGKCF4/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_Yg.dybQ5PMNP8
     
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  8. Vidofner

    Vidofner Well-Known Member

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  9. jasonrusso

    jasonrusso Well-Known Member

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    I think it is just another option. You can bolt it to the outlet box, etc. You don't have to use both.

    Yes, only the ground is metal.
     
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  10. RobBaglieri

    RobBaglieri Well-Known Member

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    this is the plug I temporarily have on my tank. I originally bought it to use with powertools outdoors when a GFCI outlet was not available. It works great. One drawback with this particular item, if there is a power outage, it must be manually reset once the power comes back on.
     
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  11. spllbnd2

    spllbnd2 Well-Known Member

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    The round terminal would be used ONLY if you are using it with a metal box. When you use that in a plastic box it does nothing.

    Think of it like this, metal screw that holds the outlet plate onto the box goes into... Plastic, no path to ground. While on a metal box that same screw that holds the outlet cover in place goes to? You guessed it, metal and onward to the ground screw that should be installed in the box per NEC.

    This is know as a bonding jumper wire.

    250.146 (A) Surface Mounted Box. Where the box is mounted on the surface, direct metal to metal contact between the device yoke and the box or a contact yoke or a self grounding receptacle shall be permitted to ground the receptacle to the box.

    250.146 (B) Contact Devices or Yokes. Contact devices or yokes designed and listed as self-grounding shall be permitted in conjunction with the supporting screws to establish the grounding circuit between the device yoke and flush type boxes.

    outlet.jpg
    receptacle.jpg

    Cheers,
    Alex
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
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  12. jasonrusso

    jasonrusso Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely correct! I was under the assumption that people would realize that plastic boxes aren't grounded, but I guess not everyone is familiar with home wiring.
     
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  13. Vidofner

    Vidofner Well-Known Member

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    Your outlets look alot different than european outlets. Ive never seen anything similar to what you call bonding jumping wire :)
     
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  14. Brew12

    Brew12 Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Article Contributor Partner Member

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    I have to give you Europeans credit, you have a much safer distribution and home wiring system than we use in the US.
     
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  15. Vidofner

    Vidofner Well-Known Member

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    However, we need to deal with 220 volts instead of 110 when **** hit the fan. Ive done that. Was a scary feeling. My arm shook for like 10min after it.
     
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  16. Brew12

    Brew12 Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Article Contributor Partner Member

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    Fair point, but we use 220V also. We only use it in more limited applications like for ovens, air conditioning and electric clothes dryers.

    On thing that is often overlooked is that 50hz is less likely to cause ventricular fibrillation than 60hz is. I haven't seen a reason for that but Europeans are less likely to suffer heart failure during an electrical shock and have higher survival rates despite the higher voltage.
     
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  17. Vidofner

    Vidofner Well-Known Member

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    Also you got alot higher ampere. I don't have much electrical knowledge but i think I've read that you got 15 A in your outlets and our normal outlets faults out at 10. I think they usually keep at 2.5
     
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  18. jasonrusso

    jasonrusso Well-Known Member

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    230v at 10a is 2300 watts. 120v at 15A is 1800 watts. Europe carries more power.
     
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  19. Vidofner

    Vidofner Well-Known Member

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    But 10A is when our fuses goes so we don't usually operate with 10A. What I've read it's normally 2,5A
     
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  20. Brew12

    Brew12 Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad Article Contributor Partner Member

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    From a safety perspective, your higher system voltage or lower trip point doesn't make much difference. The majority of electrical shocks occur from a live conductor to ground. In Europe, you have 2 legs that are both 110V to ground. In the US, we typically have 1 leg at 115V to ground with the other leg being grounded. Because of this, the voltage we would typically be shocked by are almost identical.
    When 0.1 Amps for 2 seconds is considered a fatal exposure, it doesn't much matter if your fuses or breakers trip at 2.5A, 10A or 20A.
     
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